Photo of Sushila Chanana

Sushila Chanana is a high-stakes technology litigator and legal advisor, who has a background in privacy and cybersecurity. She represents companies in complex civil matters, including patent, trademark, copyright, and trade secrets disputes. Her clients have ranged from startups to Fortune 500 companies. In addition to representing clients in federal and state court, at both the trial and appellate levels, Sushila also assists clients with matters before the U.S. International Trade Commission (ITC) and the Patent Trial and Appeal Board (PTAB).

She counsels companies on compliance with various data protection laws, including the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA).

Contact: schanana@fbm.com

A few weeks ago on this blog, we addressed some of the legal issues that have arisen for Zoom, as it becomes a significant part of American daily life during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Among those legal issues was an inquiry by the New York State Attorney General into Zoom’s privacy practices, and particularly into its measures to detect and prevent hackers or other outside parties attempting to observe or interfere with online meetings. In several incidents, the third parties interrupted meetings with disturbing messages or images. In fact, two other states – Connecticut and Florida – joined the New York probe after state government officials fell victim to “zoombombing.” Based on perceived security flaws, on April 6, 2020, the New York City Department of Education implemented a ban on public schools’ use of Zoom for classes and educational purposes.
Continue Reading Zoom Successfully Addresses New York’s Privacy and Security Concerns

As privacy-related litigation continues to heat up, Judge Beth Freeman (ND Cal.) recently laid out in In re Google Assistant Privacy Litigation (Case No. 19-cv-04286)[1] a potential roadmap for surviving or winning a motion to dismiss on privacy-related causes of action.

The consolidated lawsuit against Google alleges violations on twelve counts, all relating to the Google Assistant product – a voice-activated technology used in mobile and home devices that listens for “hotwords” in order to carry out user commands. This case is an important one to watch and should be broadly instructive as many companies, big and small, are and have been hard at work on voice-activated technologies (compare, for instance, to Amazon’s Alexa, Apple’s Siri, and countless speech recognition start-ups around the world). Huge numbers of households and individuals currently have these devices in their homes and/or on their person at all times.
Continue Reading A Roadmap to Litigating Privacy Claims? A Look at a Recent Order From the Google Assistant Privacy Litigation

As large portions of society become subject to coronavirus-related quarantines, increasing numbers of people have turned to web-based communications platforms for classes, meetings, events, and socialization. One such platform, Zoom, has become, in some estimations, the most important app in the business world, and the single most downloaded mobile app in all of India.

With such rapid expansion in its user base, there was bound to be increased focus on the company. Over the last few weeks, Zoom has faced questions related to the legality of its privacy and information-gathering practices. In fact, in addition to addressing concerns on social media and national television programs, Zoom must also now defend itself in a new class action lawsuit involving the newly enacted California Consumer Privacy Act (“CCPA”), which we analyze below.
Continue Reading New CCPA Lawsuit Against Zoom: Issues to Watch